Filed under In Season

Time for tomatillos

Time for tomatillos

Tomatillos take me back to San Miguel de Allende, the fabled artist’s colony in the hills four hours northwest of Mexico City. On my first visit earlier this month, I drank homemade margaritas on a rooftop terrace with friends while watching the sun set, and spent days strolling narrow cobblestoned streets and feasting on tortilla … Continue reading

Savoy faire

Savoy faire

That basketball of a green cabbage lounging in the produce department has a lot going for it. It’s a nutritional powerhouse, it feeds an army, it’s economical and lasts for weeks in the fridge. But you really must meet its sophisticated cousin, the savoy. It’s the pretty one, more oval in shape and clad with layer upon … Continue reading

Pass the Pomelo

Pass the Pomelo

Whether you spell it pomelo or pummelo, we’re talking one BIG piece of fruit. “It’s hard to get people to try them,” admits Gary Laux, a fourth-generation California citrus grower, “but don’t be overwhelmed by their size — once you get inside, that’s where all the fun’s at.” Laux has been growing the world’s largest … Continue reading

Master of shallots

Master of shallots

Frank Schroyens loves the finer things in life. In 1980, the former Belgian diamond cutter traded his specialized tools for a tractor on a tobacco farm in Southern Ontario. In 1999, Schroyens switched to growing shallots, a crop beloved in Europe. At the time they were unknown here outside the kitchens of Euro-trained chefs. Today, … Continue reading

Root for rutabaga!

Root for rutabaga!

January 25 is a big night for rutabaga as Scots around the world celebrate the birth of their beloved poet Robert Burns 256 years ago. A traditional Burns Night feast stars haggis with bashed neeps and tatties, which translates as ground offal and oatmeal cooked in a sheep’s stomach with sides of mashed rutabaga and potatoes. … Continue reading

Time for turmeric

Time for turmeric

As a kid in Northern India, Harsh Chawla remembers his mom treating cuts and burns with a mixture of ghee and turmeric. When he returned to his hometown of Chandigarh to be married, family members slathered his face, arms and legs with a golden paste of turmeric and milk to purify and soften his skin. … Continue reading

Serve up Ontario squash

Serve up Ontario squash

    I never imagined the humble squash as a culinary rock star, but after tasting the butternut squash brownies from the new The Everyday Squash Cook book, I’ve joined the fan club. The moist, fudgy squares flecked with orange surprised even the book’s three authors, who spent a year developing simple, scrumptious squash recipes … Continue reading

Prickly pears make spooky cocktails

Prickly pears make spooky cocktails

Arizona is bracing for the annual migration of more than 550,000 Canadian snowbirds to their Southwestern state. With the Grand Canyon in the north and Yuma in the south, where 90% of North America’s greens grow between November and March, there’s plenty to see. And if you’ve never stood next to a towering Saguaro cactus with … Continue reading

Garlic goes local

Garlic goes local

  When Ontario-grown garlic sells for $2 a bulb and Chinese garlic sells for five bulbs for $1, you have to wonder why. Growers Mark Wales, president of the Garlic Growers Association of Ontario, and Peter McClusky, organizer of the 4th annual Toronto Garlic Festival at Evergreen Brick Works Sept. 21, were happy to explain. “Ontario garlic … Continue reading

Finger these limes!

Finger these limes!

Megan Shanley Warren is on a mission, to promote the funky little fruit her dad is harvesting on his California ranch. From the outside, the finger lime needs all the help Warren, a marketing grad, can muster. The leathery green or brown cylinder, 1 to 3 inches long, resemble skinny dill pickles. Cut one open and … Continue reading